Terceira

Terceira is the second most populous island in the Azores, but it is the first in terms of fun.
Despite the beauty that characterizes the Terceira’s landscape, it’s in the historical-cultural background and in the festive character of the their citizens that much of the island’s value lies.
From Angra do Heroísmo and Praia da Vitória (whose visits are mandatory), the Terceira island offers to the visitor a wide range of alternatives.
Take some time to climb the Serra do Cume! The view reaches a vastness of shades of green and some say it is the largest concentration of football fields in the world.

 


For a change, get off the mountain and go to the Biscoitos. These natural pools were formed by volcanic activity and are ideal for swimming or diving. In the interval between dives visit the various kiosks that sell local specialties.


Algar do CarvãoThe Terceira island does not end in the cities, on the mountain and on the beach!
The Algar do Carvão is an imposing manifestation of volcanism in Terceira, where the visitor is transported to the work of Jules Verne, “The Journey to the Center of the Earth”.
But the most important of this island are its people and its welcoming, fun and festive character.
Do not end your visit without eating the famous “Alcatra” or – if you are part of the group of the brave – participate in the famous “rope bullfight”.

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